Restorative Justice in British Columbia, Nova Scotia and Bangladesh: Comparative Community Praxis from Vision to Practice

M Asadullah1
1School of Criminology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada

Using qualitative methods, this doctoral research explores the growth and impact of Restorative Justice across three research sites: British Columbia (BC), Nova Scotia (NS) and Bangladesh (BD). The main objective of this paper is to map the development of RJ practices across BC, NS and BD. With that aim, survey and twenty four in-depth qualitative interviews—ten in BC, eight in NS and six in BD—have been conducted where visionaries and community practitioners from diverse background participated. Both snowball and purposive sampling techniques were used to recruit participants. This study finds contrasting examples of the role of government agencies, civil society organizations, community volunteers and funding mechanisms at different research sites. Whilst grassroots community played a pioneering role in BC, government agencies were key movers of RJ practices in NS. In Bangladesh, centuries-long salish practices, case backlogs and funding from the international community played a catalytic role to the growth of RJ and community-based justice practices. Issues that contributed to the growth of RJ in these three sites were categorized into macro, meso and micro factors. The findings of this research will not only contribute to the extant literature and practice of restorative justice, they will also play an important role within the research sites, which will set the stage for further research. The paper ends with a discussion of the challenges and areas for the future research.


Biography:
M. Asadullah is a PhD candidate at Simon Fraser University’s School of Criminology. He has a Masters in Criminology from Simon Fraser University, Canada, and a Masters in Conflict Transformation from Eastern Mennonite University, USA. His research interests include restorative justice, village court, peacemaking criminology, indigenous justice and compassionate communication. As a sessional faculty, Asadullah taught Restorative Justice at Simon Fraser University and Peace & Conflict Studies at the University of the Fraser Valley for a number of semesters. He is the recipient of multiple awards and scholarships including ACJS Doctoral Fellowship Award, C.D. Nelson Memorial Graduate Award, Provost Prize of Distinction, Graduate Fellowship and Law Foundation Scholarship in Restorative Justice. Currently, he is the board member of Vancouver Association for Restorative Justice and Salish Sea Empathy Society. He volunteers in both federal and provincial prisons. Asadullah is an NVC Certification candidate with the Center for Nonviolent Communication, USA. To showcase his work, he has participated in a number of international trainings and conferences in Canada, China, Malaysia, Thailand, Norway, Turkey, UK, and USA.

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