Contrasting the conception and role of victims across the public-private spectrum

Prof. Marie Manikis1
1Faculty of Law, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

This presentation argues that the scholarship to date on victims in the criminal process has mainly adopted a private conception of victims – as bearers of individual interests and personal rights – rather than a conception of the victim as an actor with public functions, who has historically and continuously taken on an active role in the common law tradition. This conception enables a greater understanding of some of the various developments around victim participation in common law criminal justice systems and provides a useful analytical tool to understand the different participatory roles of victims.


Biography:

Marie Manikis is an assistant professor in the Faculty of Law and a member of the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism, McGill University, and the International Centre for Comparative Criminology, University of Montreal. She teaches criminal justice, criminal law, sentencing, and criminal procedure. In 2017, she received the Dean of the Faculty of Law’s Research Merit Award.

From 2010-2014, she undertook doctoral studies in law at the University of Oxford that were supported by the SSHRC, the FQRSC, the Maple Leaf Trust, the Peter Birks fund and the Modern Law Review.

She was a member of the editorial board for the Ottawa Law Review (2016-2017) and has provided consultation reports based on evidence-based policy for the Department of Justice in Canada, the Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime, the Ministry of Justice in England and Wales and the Canadian Senate. Prior to this, she practiced law and clerked for a Superior Court Justice in Canada.

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