An ethical framework for managing social media intelligence

N. Gilmour

New Zealand Police, nicholas.gilmour@police.gvt.nz

As intelligence collection capabilities evolve in line with the increasingly technical nature of international security threats, it is increasingly important for intelligence practitioners to be equipped with a sound ethical framework for managing intelligence¬—especially in the context of technological surveillance.

This presentation considers some of the issues associated with transferring David Omand’s ethical framework internationally, assesses its overall applicability to social media intelligence (SOCMINT), and posits the most significant challenges to its implementation in the contemporary and future intelligence environments. It is argued that while Omand’s ethical framework is helpful in establishing boundaries for public sector intelligence agencies, to be of true value to the international intelligence community (IC) the framework must be firmly embedded within intelligence oversight legislation.

Biography

Dr Nicholas Gilmour is the New Zealand Police Fellow at Massey University in Wellington responsible for research supervision and teaching Masters Degree papers on intelligence, crime & security, and crime science.

An ethical framework for managing social media intelligence

N. Gilmour

New Zealand Police, nicholas.gilmour@police.gvt.nz

As intelligence collection capabilities evolve in line with the increasingly technical nature of international security threats, it is increasingly important for intelligence practitioners to be equipped with a sound ethical framework for managing intelligence¬—especially in the context of technological surveillance.

This presentation considers some of the issues associated with transferring David Omand’s ethical framework internationally, assesses its overall applicability to social media intelligence (SOCMINT), and posits the most significant challenges to its implementation in the contemporary and future intelligence environments. It is argued that while Omand’s ethical framework is helpful in establishing boundaries for public sector intelligence agencies, to be of true value to the international intelligence community (IC) the framework must be firmly embedded within intelligence oversight legislation.

Biography

Dr Nicholas Gilmour is the New Zealand Police Fellow at Massey University in Wellington responsible for research supervision and teaching Masters Degree papers on intelligence, crime & security, and crime science.

Is there a plan for organised crime policy in Queensland?

M.Lauchs

Queensland University of Technology, m.lauchs@qut.edu.au

The Queensland Government has taken major steps to respond to organised crime in the last seven years, including extensive expansions of legislation and, in 2015-16, two major independent reviews. But it is not clear that there is a coherent definition of organised crime or a social goal to align the activities and measure success. Many politicians still harbour mythical pictures of organised crime as Mafia style bodies (Cressey 1969; Albini & McIllwain 2012) or have recharacterised it entirely as a problem with motorcycle gangs (Lauchs, Bain & Bell 2015). The characterisation of organised crime and its social harm is still a contested area in academic literature as well as international policy (von Lampe 2016) and policy makers too frequently look for policy responses solely within the justice system rather than across government. This paper will examine the legislative debates, the Queensland Organised Crime Commission of Inquiry 2015 and the Report of the Taskforce on Organised Crime Legislation 2016 to determine the manner in which organised crime is perceived in Queensland and whether there is a coherent picture of a response and measure of success.

Biography

Mark is an Associate Professor at QUT who researches corruption and organised crime with a focus on outlaw motorcycle gangs. He teaches policy and coordinates the undergraduate and post-graduate policy courses at the School of Justice.

Is there a plan for organised crime policy in Queensland?

M.Lauchs

Queensland University of Technology, m.lauchs@qut.edu.au

The Queensland Government has taken major steps to respond to organised crime in the last seven years, including extensive expansions of legislation and, in 2015-16, two major independent reviews. But it is not clear that there is a coherent definition of organised crime or a social goal to align the activities and measure success. Many politicians still harbour mythical pictures of organised crime as Mafia style bodies (Cressey 1969; Albini & McIllwain 2012) or have recharacterised it entirely as a problem with motorcycle gangs (Lauchs, Bain & Bell 2015). The characterisation of organised crime and its social harm is still a contested area in academic literature as well as international policy (von Lampe 2016) and policy makers too frequently look for policy responses solely within the justice system rather than across government. This paper will examine the legislative debates, the Queensland Organised Crime Commission of Inquiry 2015 and the Report of the Taskforce on Organised Crime Legislation 2016 to determine the manner in which organised crime is perceived in Queensland and whether there is a coherent picture of a response and measure of success.

Biography

Mark is an Associate Professor at QUT who researches corruption and organised crime with a focus on outlaw motorcycle gangs. He teaches policy and coordinates the undergraduate and post-graduate policy courses at the School of Justice.

Intelligence: Are existing intelligence arrangements hampering Australia’s law enforcement and security efforts to fight crime and terrorism?

Dr Phil Kowalick

Adjunct Professor, Queensland University of Technology and Adjunct Senior Lecturer University of New England, Philip.kowalick@bigpond.com

Security and terrorism threats are at the forefront of many concerns for Australian society, law enforcement and security agencies. There is no argument against the proposition that serious and organised crime has a significant impact on the security of Australia. It has the potential to destabilise Australia’s social and economic fabric; yet it continues unabated despite the efforts of agencies responsible for policy, law enforcement, regulation and compliance over the past 40 years or more.

A significant contributor to this situation is the approach taken in Australia by many government agencies to criminal intelligence and its role in protecting Australia and our way of life from these threats. If we fail to address the existing systemic problems in criminal intelligence, serious and organised crime will continue to grow and its impact, in social and economic terms, will manifest so deeply as to be intractable.

A critical analysis, adopting a mixed methods approach, has reviewed the current approach to criminal intelligence collection and dissemination; the wicked problems, including endemic cultural issues, impacting the ability to achieve what is necessary; and the strengths and weaknesses of current arrangements. It explores a range of changes that that would ensure a more robust and holistic approach to criminal intelligence from Australian government agencies and the private sector.

It is imperative that significant changes are made to existing frameworks to enable criminal intelligence to strengthen operational outputs and organisational decision-making with the aim of securing Australia’s future.

Biography

Dr Philip Kowalick holds a PhD in Law from the University of New England and is an industry expert in law enforcement, intelligence and national security. He consults to government and tertiary institutions on those disciplines and on strategic organisational design. Philip was a Commander in the Australian Federal Police having held senior executive roles in Intelligence, Counter Terrorism and Protection. He is a member of the Advisory Committee, School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology and is the current President of the Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers. Philip has researched in law, witness protection, intelligence and counter terrorism.

Intelligence: Are existing intelligence arrangements hampering Australia’s law enforcement and security efforts to fight crime and terrorism?

Dr Phil Kowalick

Adjunct Professor, Queensland University of Technology and Adjunct Senior Lecturer University of New England, Philip.kowalick@bigpond.com

Security and terrorism threats are at the forefront of many concerns for Australian society, law enforcement and security agencies. There is no argument against the proposition that serious and organised crime has a significant impact on the security of Australia. It has the potential to destabilise Australia’s social and economic fabric; yet it continues unabated despite the efforts of agencies responsible for policy, law enforcement, regulation and compliance over the past 40 years or more.

A significant contributor to this situation is the approach taken in Australia by many government agencies to criminal intelligence and its role in protecting Australia and our way of life from these threats. If we fail to address the existing systemic problems in criminal intelligence, serious and organised crime will continue to grow and its impact, in social and economic terms, will manifest so deeply as to be intractable.

A critical analysis, adopting a mixed methods approach, has reviewed the current approach to criminal intelligence collection and dissemination; the wicked problems, including endemic cultural issues, impacting the ability to achieve what is necessary; and the strengths and weaknesses of current arrangements. It explores a range of changes that that would ensure a more robust and holistic approach to criminal intelligence from Australian government agencies and the private sector.

It is imperative that significant changes are made to existing frameworks to enable criminal intelligence to strengthen operational outputs and organisational decision-making with the aim of securing Australia’s future.

Biography

Dr Philip Kowalick holds a PhD in Law from the University of New England and is an industry expert in law enforcement, intelligence and national security. He consults to government and tertiary institutions on those disciplines and on strategic organisational design. Philip was a Commander in the Australian Federal Police having held senior executive roles in Intelligence, Counter Terrorism and Protection. He is a member of the Advisory Committee, School of Justice, Queensland University of Technology and is the current President of the Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers. Philip has researched in law, witness protection, intelligence and counter terrorism.

ABOUT ANZSOC

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