Non-governmental and voluntary sector organisations in criminal justice and drug policy processes

Professor Rosie Meek3 3Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, United Kingdom There is a strong history of voluntary sector involvement in British prisons, spanning involvement in a wide range of services, including prisoner education, healthcare, housing support and through-the-gate provision....
  • October 3, 2018
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Dr Alice  Mills2 2University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in New Zealand have an enduring history of providing services for people leaving prison, and are the current providers of most post-release services. Since the ‘contract crunch’ (McCarthy...
  • October 3, 2018
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Dr Natalie Thomas1 1University Of New England, Armidale, Australia Civil society participation in drug policy processes is an important part of international and domestic drug policy systems. Non-government and civil society organisations act as key service providers and policy actors...
  • October 3, 2018
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Dr  Mary Corcoran4 4Keele University, Keele, United Kingdom The profile of the voluntary/charitable sector’s work in criminal justice has become sharply magnified in recent years as ‘Anglophone’ capitalist countries turn towards mixed-market models in public services.  Austerity, welfare state shrinkage,...
  • October 3, 2018
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