Ethics Companion for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-focused Research in Criminology and Criminal Justice

Prof. Elena Marchetti1, Dr Debbie Bargallie1, Professor  Chris Cunneen2, Dr Juan Tauri3, Associate Professor Megan Williams4

1Griffith University, Nathan, Australia
2University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia
3University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand
4The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

Currently, criminology and criminal justice research and evaluations that involve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people must follow the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) ‘Australian Code of Ethics for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research’ (2020) and/or the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)’s ‘Ethical Conduct in Research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People and Communities: Guidelines for Researchers and Stakeholders’ (2018). Neither of these documents are specific to research or evaluations in criminology or criminal justice, resulting in discipline-related gaps. Discipline-specific characteristics of criminology and criminal justice research must be better understood for how they fit with ethical review guidelines, and how research and evaluations can be relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s cultures and social contexts. This is necessary given the over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the Australian criminal justice system, and the need for criminology and criminal justice research and evaluations to respect the rights, values, knowledges and strengths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities. This presentation introduces the ‘Ethics Companion for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-focused Research in Criminology and Criminal Justice’, and explains its development and relevance for criminology and criminal justice researchers and evaluators.


Biography:

Bios to come

Date

Aug 26 2021
Expired!

Time

8:00 am - 6:00 pm